Martin M Monti

USA

Martin M Monti

USA

Biography

Dr. Martin M Monti is associate professor in the Departments of Psychology and Neurosurgery at UCLA. Prior to joining the faculty at UCLA, in 2011, he received his doctorate in Psychology and Neurosciences at Princeton University (Princeton, NJ, USA), and spent three years as a Career Development Fellow at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit in Cambridge, UK. His research focuses on the mechanisms by which consciousness is implemented in the human brain, and why/how consciousness is lost and (sometimes) recovered after severe brain injury. Hi research is thus focused on patients in a state of Coma, in a Vegetative State or Minimally Conscious State. In addition, more recently, Dr Monti has begun exploring neurorestorative interventions for patients suffering from disorders of consciousness, employing non-invasive methods such as focused ultrasound pulsation aimed at thalamic tissue. Prof. Monti’s research has been featured in a number of international journals including The New England Journal of Medicine, the British Medical Journal, Annals of Neurology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, Cerebral Cortex, and Brain, among others, and has been featured in popular media outlets, including television (e.g., CNN, BBC, CBS) and print (e.g., Time Magazine, LA Times, Technology Report, Huffington Post). Dr. Monti was recognized as a “Rising Star” by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) in 2013. His work on the mechanisms of loss of consciousness in anesthesia was recognized, in 2014, with the UCLA Life Science Faculty Award for Outstanding Research Publication. See http://montilab.psych.ucla.edu

 

WORLD CONGRESS PRESENTATION

Therapeutic Options for the Recovery of Severely Brain Injured Patients: The Field of Neuromodulation

Keynote Lecture: Recovering Consciousness after Severe Brain Injury: From Science to Clinic
Organized by the Disorders of Consciousness Special Interest Group (DOC-SIG)

The mechanisms underlying loss as well as recovery of consciousness after a severe brain injury remain incompletely understood. Gaining a clearer understanding of the exact neural mechanisms that lead to a disorder of consciousness, such as the vegetative state or the minimally conscious state, is paramount for optimizing diagnosis, prognosis and restorative interventions. This presentation will focus on recent work highlighting, in vivo, (i) the intimate relationship between patient diagnosis and specific functional and structural brain abnormalities within cortico-subcortical mechanisms, and (ii) the exciting new development of techniques to assess the residual presence of complex brain functions, as well as new neurorestorative interventions aimed at facilitating brain function recovery.

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