Technology-assisted Interventions for Pediatric Brain Injury

DESCRIPTION

Increasingly technology (websites, smart-phone apps, computer-assisted therapy programs) is employed to address recovery and adaptation following brain injury in children. This symposium focuses on four novel programs addressing physical, behavioral, social and classroom functioning following brain injuries of varying severities. Dr. Wade will present findings from a multi-site randomized clinical trial of Internet-based Interacting Together Everyday, Recovery After Childhood TBI (I-InTERACT). This program involves online parenting skills training that integrates self-guided didactic information regarding effective parenting following TBI with live, in-vivo coaching with a trained therapist via Skype. Satisfaction, adherence, and efficacy from a randomized trial comparing brief (7 sessions) versus longer (10-14 sessions) versions of the I-InTERACT program, relative to access to internet resources, will be presented. Dr. Babcock will describe a novel web-based program for mild TBI-Self-Management Activity-regulation and Relaxation Training (SMART). The SMART program includes: (1) daily symptom and activity monitoring providing personalized feedback to promote self-management and (2) educational modules incorporating principles of anticipatory guidance, self-regulation/relaxation, cognitive reframing, and problem solving to cope with post-concussive symptoms. She will report preliminary findings regarding feasibility, safety, and efficacy while highlighting areas for refinement. Dr. Bedell will describe development and testing of an iphone-based app and peer coaching intervention, the Social Participation and Navigation (SPAN) program, which was designed to promote social participation in teens with a history of acquired brain injury. He will present findings regarding feasibility, satisfaction, and efficacy from a pilot study involving 15 adolescents with ABI and their college-student coaches. Dr. Rode will present efficacy data for TBItutor, a web-based intelligent tutoring program to promote acquisition and retention of content while the student is engaged with scholastic material. TBItutor integrates Natural Language Processing (NLP) technology and evidence-based learning strategies (e.g. deep semantic processing, retrieval practice) to provide students with an app that can be used at home or in school to study academic content. The potential of TBItutor to effectively improve academic performance has been evaluated in a randomized controlled study (N=20) and a feasibility field study (N=30) with high school and college students with mild to moderate brain injury. Discussion will focus on challenges to delivering technology-based interventions for youth with TBI and their families, factors that promote utilization, the merits of various delivery platforms, and the role of support people such as parents and teachers in scaffolding or supporting patient engagement.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • Identify three programs in which technology is being used to support recovery following pediatric brain injury.
  • List one outcome that was targeted by each intervention and whether the intervention resulted in improvements in the outcome.
  • Describe two challenges to delivering technology-supported intervention programs.
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http://ibia2017.org/technology-assisted-interventions-for-pediatric-brain-injury/